PUPILS PERCEPTION TOWARDS CORPORAL PUNISHMENT IN PRIMARY SCHOOL

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

Background of the Study

The Convention on the Rights of the Child is the first legally binding international instrument to incorporate the full range of human rights: civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights. The Convention sets out these rights in 54 articles and two optional protocols. It voices the basic human rights that children everywhere have: the right to survival; to develop to the fullest; to protection from harmful influences, abuse and exploitation; and to participate fully in family, cultural and social life. The four core principles of the Convention are non-discrimination; devotion to the best interests of the child; the right to life, survival and development; and respect for the views of the child. Every right stated in the Convention is inherent to the human dignity and harmonious development of every child. The Convention protects children’s rights by setting standards in health care; education; and legal, civil and social services (UNICEF, 2009). On the other hand, it is widely believed that discipline is required for students in order for them to be successful in education, especially during the compulsory education period. Eggleton (2001) defines discipline as a training, which corrects, molds or perfects the mental faculties, or moral characters, obedience to authority or rules, punishment to correct poor behaviors. Generally, school discipline is defined as school policies and actions taken by school personnel to prevent students from unwanted behaviors, primarily focusing on school conduct codes and security methods, suspension from school, corporal punishment, and teachers‟ methods of managing students‟ actions in class (Cameron, 2006). The main aspects of discipline in schools are respect to each other, punctuality; honest that gives no room for cheating in academics, trust and many others.

Moreover, the study (ibid) reveals that educators had not experienced any harmful effects when it was administered to them as learners so they see no reason why they should not administer CP to their learners as well. Mwananchi (2012) asserts that teachers feel unprotected while students enjoy and feel that no other disciplinary measures such as CP can be applied to them. Thus, CP is seen as the sign of authority of teachers and mechanism of inculcating discipline among students in Tanzanian schools. However, in some cases especially when used inappropriately, CP causes harm to the subjects. Some scholars like Benjet and Kazdin (2003) are of the view that the use of CP in schools has harmful effects that include implicitly modeling and teaching that violence is an effective approach to solving problems. In Ruvuma region, a teacher was reported to police for having caused serious injury to a student through CP (Chidye, 2006)

How to get complete project materials


WE ALSO ACCEPT BITCOIN:  1622QAeaHXnWPArT7bBC6zX4ywsu5t3PmQ Step 1: make payment of N2,500 to any of the bank below


NAME:                       TITUS AYANI SOLA
BANK:                       FIRST BANK PLC
ACCT NO:                  3111741042
ACCOUNT TYPE:       SAVINGS
AMOUNT:                  N2,500

NAME:                       TITUS AYANI SOLA


BANK:                       ACCESS BANK
ACCT NO:                  1244558139

NAME:                       TITUS AYANI SOLA


BANK:                       GTB BANK
ACCT NO:                  0262412831
ACCOUNT TYPE:       SAVINGS

STEP 2: AFTER PAYMENT SEND THE PROJECT TOPIC AND YOUR MODE OF DELIVERY (EMAIL ADDRESS OR WHATSAPP) TO 08063666753

CLICK ON THE IMAGE BELOW TO REQUEST FOR MATERIAL

WE ALSO ACCEPT BITCOIN:  1622QAeaHXnWPArT7bBC6zX4ywsu5t3PmQ

Updated: 8th December 2019 — 2:00 pm

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

94 − 89 =